WHY PAKISTANIS DON’T LIKE THEIR NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS
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WHY PAKISTANIS DON’T LIKE THEIR NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS
Annotation
PII
S0321-50750000617-4-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Pages
50-53
Abstract
On 10 October 2014, Malala Yousafzai, a school-girl from Pakistan, was announced as the co-recipient of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize for her struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education. At age 17, Yousafzai is the youngest Nobel Prize laureate in history. Yousafzai shared the prize with Kailash Satyarthi, a children’s rights activist from India. She is the second Pakistani to receive a Nobel Prize, Abdus Salam being a 1979 Physics laureate. After she won the Nobel Peace Prize, there was praise but also some disapproval of the decision to award it to her. Yousafzai’s critics in Pakistan say that her fame highlights Pakistan’s most negative aspect, and the West’s admiration of her is hypocritical because it overlooks the plight of other innocent victims, like the casualties of U.S. drone strikes. Some journalists described her as being used to justify Western imperialism as «the perfect candidate for the white man to relieve his burden and save the native».
Keywords
Nobel Peace Prize 2014, Pakistan, India, Malala Yousafzai, conspiracy theories
Date of publication
01.01.2015
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273
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1. Suvorova A.A. Malala: devochka-simvol bor'by s talibami // Aziya i Afrika segodnya, 2013, № 11. (Suvorova A.A. 2013. Malala: devochka-simvol borby s talibami // Azia i Afrika segodnya. № 11) (in Russian)

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