SOMALI IN SOUTH AFRICA: PROBLEMS OF ADAPTATION
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SOMALI IN SOUTH AFRICA: PROBLEMS OF ADAPTATION
Annotation
PII
S0321-50750000616-3-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Pages
28-31
Abstract
The image of Somali as a failed state of anarchy and numerous failed attempts to stabilize situation in the country is in contrast with successful stories of Somali businessmen from Somali Diaspora, who manage to keep their national identity and take an active part in economical and political life in their homeland. Somali businessmen are known for their strong motivation, hard-working and strong family and clan support. Somali immigrants face different problems in South Africa - in the sphere of business relations, cultural adaptation and communication with locals. Somali immigrants have become the most numerous ethnic group in Johannesburg and in Cape Town. They have put some new problems for local authorities and aggravated some local conflicts. Xenophobia or so-called afrophobia partly is a result of economic competition and inability of local authorities to protect the rights and interests of local entrepreneurs.
Keywords
Somali diaspora, history of Somali, cultural adaptation, South Africa, xenophobia
Date of publication
01.07.2017
Number of purchasers
1
Views
388
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0.0 (0 votes)
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