COFFEE TRADITIONS IN ETHIOPIA THE SOCIAL AND SACRED MEANING OF THE COFFEE CEREMONY
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COFFEE TRADITIONS IN ETHIOPIA THE SOCIAL AND SACRED MEANING OF THE COFFEE CEREMONY
Annotation
PII
S0321-50750000616-3-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Pages
72-75
Abstract
The article analyzes the coffee traditions of Ethiopia. It is shown what kind of culture the coffee grain has formed around itself. The coffee culture of Ethiopia is interesting for its dissimilarity with the European one. For African countries that grow coffee, it is not just a drink or a meal. The Ethiopian proverb says: «Coffee is our bread» («Buna dabo naw»). Coffee for Ethiopia is life itself. The most important coffee ritual of the country is the ceremony of buna (coffee ceremony). The ceremony accompanies every day, as well as especially significant events in the life of the family and community. It is inherent in a fairly strict ritual and the using of certain instruments, such as jebena. It has deep religious roots, and also plays a significant social role, especially in women's lives
Keywords
сoffee, Ethiopia, coffee ceremony, jebena, buna ceremony
Date of publication
01.01.2018
Number of purchasers
5
Views
260
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0.0 (0 votes)
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Additional sources and materials

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