THE MEMORY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN EAST AFRICA
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THE MEMORY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN EAST AFRICA
Annotation
PII
S0321-50750000616-3-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Pages
65-67
Abstract
The article briefly observes the formation of German East Africa colony and local population resistance against colonization. We consider the military situation on the frontline during the First World War in East Africa since 1916, when the Entente demonstrated clearly its advantages in the war. German commander in East Africa Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck adopted a querilla strategy, drawing more and more areas into the war, which allowed him to resist for a long time. In this case the brunt of military trials fell on Africans. It is precisely because many Africans were involved in the military confrontations, as soldiers or bearers, and formed part of the opposing armies as a result of the forced conscription.The longest were battles over large areas of East Africa, which recorded the biggest loss of life. The memorial complexes of personalized war graves in modern Tanzania, which made up a large part of the former colony of German East Africa, give an idea of the composition of the allied forces. This memorialization perpetuates the memory of those killed at the front in East Africa, and marks the importance of the war victims.
Keywords
The First World War, East Africa, combatants, memorials
Date of publication
01.10.2016
Number of purchasers
0
Views
490
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0.0 (0 votes)
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References



Additional sources and materials

1. Shlyonskaya S.M. Ob'edinyonnaya Respublika Tanzaniya.M., 2014. S. 49.     
2. Lettov-Forbek. Moi vospominaniya o Vostochnoj Afrike. Voennyj vestnik. M., 1927.  
3. Whittingham S. Mnemonics for War: Trench Art and the Reconciliation of Public and Private Memory // PastImperfect. 2008. № 14, p. 86-119.  
4. Ellis John, Cox Michael. The World War IDatabook: The Essential Facts and Figures for all the Combatants. Aurum Press, London, England, UK. 2004.

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